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After a bit of a rest we’re back with another commentary, continuing to mercilessly cleave through the the Dave era. Next on our hit list is Officer Rimmer, and whether or not we can get over the fact that it ended way too abruptly and actually talk about the episode itself is something you will have to discover yourself by listening, but what I will tell you that our commentary is followed by another edition of Waffle Men in which we delve into the history of telethons and logos.

DwarfCast 120 – Officer Rimmer (95.4MB)

As always we welcome new waffle subjects to keep our every growing hunger at bay so please comment here or Tweet us with any subject you’d like us to tackle. In the meantime we’re building up to the recording of our next Book Club, so head on over to the current active thread and make sure you give us your thoughts on Better Than Life part 2 before this weekend’s recording.

Show notes:

23 comments on “DwarfCast 120 – Officer Rimmer Commentary

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  • Waffley comments – Cappsy – “That moment”.
    When I walked into the Dear Dave recording, and you and Danny said about seeing the logo on the monitor… The grin on my face was a mile wide.

    Also, the ring pulls – the first time I saw one of the new ones was on a can held by a neighbour, and I was under the delusion that it was resealable.

  • Yeah, BT = Bloodteller and it is a point of contention over on the discord server that she will make a case for Can’t Smeg being cannon.

  • That flat non-skewomorphic design Google called it Material Design if memory serves.

    That is / was specific to Google app and android UI but I think that’s probably the word you were looking for.

  • Yeah, that’s certainly Google’s take on it but it was also happening with Apple at the time too as they moved away from wood panelling every fucking thing in sight and making things look like an interface rather than real life things.

  • I think things are abit more formulaic in the dave era. like you guys mention the Rimmer and Kryten science room dynamic and those scenes are often driven by a repeated comedy formula.

    I really don’t like that scene between them in The Promise Land, the whole erase your memory gag is just laid out so contrived for my liking.

  • Yeah, that’s certainly Google’s take on it but it was also happening with Apple at the time too as they moved away from wood panelling every fucking thing in sight and making things look like an interface rather than real life things.

    Oh I know Apple did it too, it’s just as far as I know Google were the only company to put a specific name to it.

  • Yeah, that’s certainly Google’s take on it but it was also happening with Apple at the time too as they moved away from wood panelling every fucking thing in sight and making things look like an interface rather than real life things.

    I hate Apple with a passion, but one thing they did really nicely was their older Podcast app which had a reel-to reel recorder design. I really enjoyed that.

  • Well, the w’fflem’n logos discussion was excellent. I agree on the Blu-Ray boxset – so near and yet so far.

  • I dislike the serif font in all cases. I do like Times and serif fonts, but only in the right circumstances. If something wants to look formal, or serious, or maybe slightly old, serif fonts work well. They’re totally un-comedy and un-sci-fi, though.

    Wafflem’n point, and general soul bearing: for me, part of Red Dwarf is the look of the show. I actually think one of the biggest barriers to me enjoying the Dave era quite as much as the bubble – other than scripts blatantly needing another draft – is how polished it looks. I’m not going down the “it was better with wobbly sets” route, but because most of my time watching the show has come from playing my 1-VI tapes over and over, the grainy video look has become part of the texture of the programme itself, and in some ways the modern digital look is even more of a barrier than the film-look layer on VII was. Maybe it’s partially because the slightly gritty look adds to the grimy feel of the ship, maybe it’s nostalgia, maybe it’s the huge leaps taken between eras. But I always wish the show just looked a bit murkier.

  • Given that the first novel came out before Series III, and assuming it was used on the original cover, would that have been the first time the logo appeared on anything?

    Captain Herring reminds me of the wheelers in Return to Oz. They used to shit me up something rotten.

  • i wonder if microgramma looked really retro in the first place, harking back to old sci-fi like ufo, but less so in the 90s which was quite 60s, and looks more and more normal going into normcore apple modernism

  • Am I alone in watching old montage videos (such as that there Bohemian Rhapsody vid) looking out for all the ‘slebs who’ve died in the intervening 25 years or so?
    (So far I’ve spotted old age, disease and murder.)

  • There’s a real mixture of revulsion and delight at that mix of celebs. Noel Edmonds and Esther Rantzen one minute, Trevor & Simon and the cast of Drop the Dead Donkey the next.

  • (I always wonder with those things whether they film the entire song with all the participants and then just pick out short clips in the edit, or whether they only film short sections with each.

    Presumably for bits that echo the original video like the Birds of a Feather opening and closing section they’d just shoot those bits. But did the cast of Red Dwarf have to stand there for five minutes and mime to the whole song?)

  • Usually, unless you have scene specific bits for music video like that (as you say with Birds of a Feather) you film the entire song and then choose the bits from each take that you want.

    They might do it differently for a charity video like this, but I also can’t imagine they’d limit themselves to only having one or two shots of participants that might then end up unusable.

    It would also require someone to sit down and plan out the entire video in advance, which celebs have which bits to mime/sing along to etc. Which feels like an unnecessary task (again unless it’s scene specific) and again, limits you to the footage you have to edit together later on.

    So my guess is the cast mimed the whole lot of it.

  • Usually, unless you have scene specific bits for music video like that (as you say with Birds of a Feather) you film the entire song and then choose the bits from each take that you want.

    They might do it differently for a charity video like this, but I also can’t imagine they’d limit themselves to only having one or two shots of participants that might then end up unusable.
    It would also require someone to sit down and plan out the entire video in advance, which celebs have which bits to mime/sing along to etc. Which feels like an unnecessary task (again unless it’s scene specific) and again, limits you to the footage you have to edit together later on.
    So my guess is the cast mimed the whole lot of it.

    That would make sense.

    Same for the Perfect Day video, do you reckon?

  • Usually, unless you have scene specific bits for music video like that (as you say with Birds of a Feather) you film the entire song and then choose the bits from each take that you want.

    They might do it differently for a charity video like this, but I also can’t imagine they’d limit themselves to only having one or two shots of participants that might then end up unusable.
    It would also require someone to sit down and plan out the entire video in advance, which celebs have which bits to mime/sing along to etc. Which feels like an unnecessary task (again unless it’s scene specific) and again, limits you to the footage you have to edit together later on.
    So my guess is the cast mimed the whole lot of it.
    That would make sense.
    Same for the Perfect Day video, do you reckon?

    That’s more complicated as everyone has a line or two each, so everything in that falls under the “specific scene/lyric category”. Having a quick look at it now though, it’s all on a green screen, so presumably they just set up a green screen somewhere for 24hrs (probably next to the recording studio so they could do it all on the same day) and ferried people through one after the other to do their lines to camera.

    OR

    They had each artist do their own thing in front of their own green screens somewhere and send them in.

    Either way, I should imagine they just record for their bits rather than the whole song in that instance.

  • Here’s a waffle from me, a better way to of ended “Officer Rimmer”. Have one of the Rimmer heads splatter onto the camera (Probably have the background behind it be covered in green or blue) give it a line like “Oh Smeg” or “Should of thought of that” then have it slowly side down and then bring up the theme song…

  • Possible Waffl’m’n suggestion that might be particularly relevant to Krysis: how much does continuity actually matter for the show?

    For Krysis specifically, does it make any difference that Butler looks like the Robert Llewellyn version of Kryten rather than David Ross (as you might have expected for a counterpart still stuck on a Nova)? On the other hand, does it add anything to make the shot of the Nova 3 look so much like the one of the Nova 5 from Series II, or is it just empty nostalgia?

    And more widely, does it matter if the show violates its own continuity for the sake of a good story or gag? And when it does try and pick up consistent continuity from episode to episode (or between different series), how much does that actually benefit things?

  • Possible Waffl’m’n suggestion that might be particularly relevant to Krysis: how much does continuity actually matter for the show?

    For Krysis specifically, does it make any difference that Butler looks like the Robert Llewellyn version of Kryten rather than David Ross (as you might have expected for a counterpart still stuck on a Nova)? On the other hand, does it add anything to make the shot of the Nova 3 look so much like the one of the Nova 5 from Series II, or is it just empty nostalgia?
    And more widely, does it matter if the show violates its own continuity for the sake of a good story or gag? And when it does try and pick up consistent continuity from episode to episode (or between different series), how much does that actually benefit things?

    Of course, Kryten looked like the Robert Llewellyn version in the Timeslides “Birthday party on the Nova 5” moving photographs (I’m still inordinately impressed that they used the same orange Nova 5 uniforms for that though).

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