Home Forums Ganymede & Titan Forum 92 Degrees?

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  • #263532
    RealBigOleDummy
    Participant

    Excuse and forgive me if this has be asked/explained before. Just popped in series 7 , Duct Soup, and noticed something in the opening scene I have to ask about. First though.. no series 7 isn’t my favorite and Duct Soup isn’t even my favorite episode of it. I rip my DVD’s to a hard drive and seem to remember a bad place last time I watched it. Just trying to find where it is so I can re-rip.

    Anyway…. Duct Soup. Opening scene. Lister in bed trying to sleep but it’s too hot. 92 degrees hot in fact. Now, I KNOW the U.K. is on the metric system. I also know that we (U.S.) aren’t. (not THAT big a Dummy after all) My question is…… 92c is 197.6f sooooo … a bit too hot to survive. Was this episode written like that? Or is this a just a thing for us over here across the pond? What I mean is, shot this way and that’s what YOU see? Or just edited with that temp reading for us?

    #263533
    Pete Part Three
    Participant

    >Now, I KNOW the U.K. is on the metric system

    This is where you’re being led astray. We’re taking our sweet time in fully embracing metric and, while everything you can buy here is listed in metric measurements, colloquially mostly everything is referred to in imperial (apart from cash unless you’re very, very old and set in your ways).

    So pint of milk, height measurements in feet, speed limits in miles…

    Adapting to metric temperatures are a bit more advanced, but Lister/Doug is talking Fahrenheit here, for sure. So 33c in new money.

    #263534
    Dave
    Participant

    No, no, it’s like dollarpounds. In the future shown by Red Dwarf they use a brand new hybrid temperature scale called Centiheit.

    #263535
    Hamish
    Participant

    Meanwhile Canada is firmly metric with Celsius and Kilometres when it comes to weather reporting and road usage, but we might very well use Fahrenheit when talking about a fever, use pounds for measuring weight, or feet/inches for height.

    Having the freezing point of water be at 32 F° rather than 0 C° will just not do this far north.

    #263536
    Hamish
    Participant

    RIMMER: (Reading the marker) “Nodnol? 871 selim?” Nodnol? Where’s Nodnol?
    KRYTEN: It’s London, 178 miles. It’s backwards.

    CAT: What’s the selim?
    LISTER: Well, that’s obviously Bulgarian for kilometres, isn’t it?

    I do find it odd that Canada seems to have embraced kilometres more than the UK when we have the US for a neighbour.

    #263537
    RunawayTrain
    Participant

    RIMMER: (Reading the marker) “Nodnol? 871 selim?” Nodnol? Where’s Nodnol?

    KRYTEN: It’s London, 178 miles. It’s backwards.
    CAT: What’s the selim?
    LISTER: Well, that’s obviously Bulgarian for kilometres, isn’t it?
    I do find it odd that Canada seems to have embraced kilometres more than the UK when we have the US for a neighbour.

    Ha, I completely misinterpreted your post to start with and typed this all before realising my mistake! But in case anyone else on your side of the pond is curious:

    None of our road signs are in km, mostly miles. The countdown signs to a slip road off the motorway are in yards (300, 200, 100) and we have fractions of miles on road signs. The only explanation for km in Backwards I can think of is that at the time of writing they reckoned in the future things will all be measured in metric.

    (Incidentally we buy fresh pints of milk but longlife milk is sold in litres. Honey is sold most commonly in weights of 250g(?), 340g (12oz, or 3/4lb) and 454g(1lb). We buy fuel in litres, but measure efficiency in miles per gallon. So yeah, just slightly mixed up over here!)

    #263538

    It’s a very weird one. We do tend to use imperial measurement – weight, height, measures of beer, clothing sizes – but temperature is always talked about in C here. I think most people still have a vague idea about the metric equivalents to an extent, but whenever I hear people talk about temperature in Fahrenheit I genuinely have no idea how to convert it in my head. I know body temperature is just over 100 and freezing is 32, but anything outside of those two and you might as well just call it bingleworm degrees plastigrade as far as my understanding goes.

    #263542
    Jonathan Capps
    Keymaster

    I have fond memories of a holiday to Ireland and a local giving us directions with miles and kilometers being used interchangeably.

    #263547
    Flap Jack
    Participant

    92 degrees? Well that’s not quite right.

    #263548
    RunawayTrain
    Participant

    It’s a very weird one. We do tend to use imperial measurement – weight, height, measures of beer, clothing sizes – but temperature is always talked about in C here. I think most people still have a vague idea about the metric equivalents to an extent, but whenever I hear people talk about temperature in Fahrenheit I genuinely have no idea how to convert it in my head. I know body temperature is just over 100 and freezing is 32, but anything outside of those two and you might as well just call it bingleworm degrees plastigrade as far as my understanding goes.

    From The Big Bang Theory I know that 72℉ is some sort of room temperature, though I can’t remember what that is in ℃.

    92 degrees? Well that’s not quite right.

    Very good ;)

    #263550
    Katydid
    Participant

    I know body temperature is just over 100.

    If your temperature is over 100 you have a fever. 98.6 is the average.

    #263551

    I think my overall point about not knowing Fahrenheit has been conclusively proven.

    #263552
    Ian Symes
    Keymaster

    I like how in the UK we flip between Celsius and Fahrenheit depending on what point we’re trying to make. If it’s cold it’s metric, hot is imperial. “It was -4 when I left the house this morning” as opposed to “it was 25”, or indeed “92 degrees? God!” instead of “33 degrees?”.

    #263553
    evilmorwen
    Participant

    I feel like use of Fahrenheit has declined significantly in the UK since the 90s – it doesn’t even get a mention now on television weather.

    #263554
    Ian Symes
    Keymaster

    That’s a point, actually – hadn’t thought about it til you pointed it out, but you used to get both figures in the weather report, now it’s just one.

    I wonder if we’ll ever fully move over. I feel like there’ll always be exceptions. Metres instead of yards for short distances I can see, but I can’t picture anyone making the decision to switch all the road signs over to kilometres. Can’t see beer (in pubs at least) ever being sold in anything other than pints. I’ll have 568ml of Guinness please.

    #263555
    RunawayTrain
    Participant

    I feel like use of Fahrenheit has declined significantly in the UK since the 90s – it doesn’t even get a mention now on television weather.

    I have an irritatingly vague memory of the weather forecast consistently telling us both for a few weeks within the last couple of years. I can’t remember whether it was a new presenter or we were on holiday (I did say it was vague!), but it was very unusual and I wondered if it was a new thing they were trying. Clearly not a new thing, but I’ve not heard it since then either.

    For context, I was born during the early years of Red Dwarf; I didn’t know people used Fahrenheit outside of science until my 20s, when I became aware of American daily life (thanks to the internet). Interestingly in The Brittas Empire the pool temperature was displayed in ℉ for the first couple of series but was then mostly in ℃ thereafter – I think. [Oh no, what a terrible chore it will be to check … (!)]

    #263559
    RealBigOleDummy
    Participant

    Thanks everyone for clearing that up for me. Guess I really SHOULD have guessed it was something like this i.e “Backwards” and the miles bit. I DID think of your “pints” believe it or not but really just figured it was more of a traditional kind of thing. 99.9 of everything we use over here is the Imperial but almost everything has both now. Singular exception is distance as far as Football (I know I know) and mileage is concerned. You can still spot a “100 miles/160.9 km” sign up on the Interstates but even those are fast disappearing.

    #263560

    Can’t see beer (in pubs at least) ever being sold in anything other than pints. I’ll have 568ml of Guinness please.

    We could just go for a half litre (or ‘large’) like the rest of Europe, but you know lots of people would raise a stink about it, even if the price were adjusted correctly.

    #263561

    Can’t see beer (in pubs at least) ever being sold in anything other than pints. I’ll have 568ml of Guinness please.

    We could just go for a half litre (or ‘large’) like the rest of Europe, but you know lots of people would raise a stink about it, even if the price were adjusted correctly.

    I absolutely would make a stink because you *know* the price wouldn’t be adjusted accordingly.

    I like how in the UK we flip between Celsius and Fahrenheit depending on what point we’re trying to make. If it’s cold it’s metric, hot is imperial. “It was -4 when I left the house this morning” as opposed to “it was 25”, or indeed “92 degrees? God!” instead of “33 degrees?”.

    I feel like some of the rags still do what you were saying Ian, go metric for cold and imperial for hot, but that’s just to make headlines.

    #263571

    I absolutely would make a stink because you *know* the price wouldn’t be adjusted accordingly.

    I’m making a snarky remark about Express-reading Eurosceptic conservative bores, don’t turn it into a critique on capitalism, please. Let me have this one.

    #263572
    Hamish
    Participant

    I mean, better to have the price of beer not be adjusted accordingly than to have your airplane fuel not converted correctly. Yes, that really happened. Strangely nobody died.

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