Home Forums Ganymede & Titan Forum Christopher Nolan saw Red Dwarf

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  • #258815
    performingmonkey
    Participant

    #258816
    GlenTokyo
    Participant

    I don’t get it.

    Just the backwards stuff?

    When I saw the official Twitter had tweeted about it I thought it was an actual reference or something a bit more obscure.

    #258817
    Dave
    Participant

    I had exactly the same thought when I saw the trailer.

    #258818
    Ben Saunders
    Participant

    I don’t really get how it’s so related to Red Dwarf that they have to tweet about it… the whole “this hasn’t happened yet” (or whatever) thing happens in The Space Museum in 60s Who of all things, and of course I don’t assume they came up with it. Maybe there’s something more specific I’m missing

    #258819
    Dave
    Participant

    The trailers don’t spoil it, but the end of Tenet is a gloriously-filmed reverse shit in the bushes.

    #258820
    tombow
    Participant

    he was an 18 year old sci fi fan living in the UK when RD started, so he must have at least known about it

    #258822
    performingmonkey
    Participant

    I’ve seen various comments from people who know nothing of RD talking about what happens when they eat/shit etc. and it’s so glorious to point them toward ‘Backwards’ in response. :D

    Obviously none of this is meant to be an actual reference to Dwarf, but we’ll never know if a young Nolan’s viewing of series 3 has had any influence on proceedings.

    #258823
    Dave
    Participant

    Well, we might. It depends on what’s in the movie.

    #258824
    Spaceworm Jim
    Participant

    I like the look of the fight in the auditorium (or whatever it’s called) with the audience asleep, or dear. So it does the job of intriguing me without giving away anything of the plot. That’s pretty good for a modern day trailer. I hope any trailers coming keep it up.

    #258828
    Ben Saunders
    Participant

    It all looks a bit… Christopher Nolan. He tries to make everything look real (and I believe he does most of it for real, like the plane scene in Dark Knight Rises), but as a result it can look a little… boring. You can do some more interesting camera movements, Chris, it doesn’t just have to be a long shot, we’ll take your word for it that it’s not CGI or anything. I’m not even asking for CGI, it’s just… it’s like the entire goal of his direction is to make things “look real”, but you can shoot real things in a much more pace-y manner. There are some famous examples of action scenes in The Dark Knight Rises which are awkward, with various silly things happening in them, and I gather you’re supposed to be impressed by how this is all really happening and they did it for real, in one take etc. But I’ve never really been interested in anything that’s done in one take, I just think… well done? It becomes more about wanking off the director for being really clever than what’s actually going to propel the story or the action forward.

    I did appreciate how the trailer was kept to a much better level of intrigue and not just explaining the entire plot of the movie, though, I’ll give it that.

    #258829
    Pete Part Three
    Participant

    >It all looks a bit… Christopher Nolan.

    Everything I want from a Christopher Nolan movie. Excellent.

    #258830
    Dave
    Participant

    I don’t know, I’m going to be pissed off if this is yet another Christopher Nolan film that looks like it was directed by Christopher Nolan.

    #258831
    Shoes Have Soles
    Participant

    Does this mean that the next Red Dwarf special will have Michael Caine in having a backwards dump?

    #258832
    bloodteller
    Participant

    >Does this mean that the next Red Dwarf special will have Michael Caine in having a backwards dump?

    blow on me bloody doors

    #258837
    Spaceworm Jim
    Participant

    I disagree with pretty much every point you’ve made, Ben, but I’m not going to argue because they all seem personal and as such it would most likely devolve into “I feel this way about this aspect”, “well I don’t” and so on. But you did make me feel a little defensive about liking the Nolan films I’ve seen, must admit. I think they do value intelligence but it’s always tied to emotions. At the climax of Interstellar (spoiler warning), yes there’s stuff going on about string theory or something, but the point isn’t the science, the point is this man has missed his daughter grow up and is desperate to get back to get back to her. Nealy all of his films that I’ve seen (not all of them, mind, I haven’t seen the Prestige, Dunkirk, and I think there’s another one…) are about grief and people refusing to grieve in a healthy way. Would a criticism be that this theme of grief may be cynical and used specifically to ground the stories of his films? I don’t know really, I don’t know the man, but I do like his films. If Tenet shows that Nolan has moved on from the grief theme, I’ll eat my hat. Or backwards shit in some bushes.

    #258838
    Spaceworm Jim
    Participant

    Just wanted to add that I’m fully aware that my liking his films is just as personal as you not enjoying them, Ben, and also wanted to say I didn’t mean to sound like I was having a go at you or anything for how C Nolan’s films make you feel.

    #258841
    performingmonkey
    Participant

    > I haven’t seen the Prestige…

    Please do. I’m pretty biased, cause it’s one of my favourite films of all-time, but yeah…asap, if you would.

    #258842
    Spaceworm Jim
    Participant

    I will do so immediately. Sir.

    #258844
    Nick R
    Participant

    But I’ve never really been interested in anything that’s done in one take, I just think… well done? It becomes more about wanking off the director for being really clever than what’s actually going to propel the story or the action forward.

    I don’t really think of Nolan as being a director who tries to impress us for doing things in one take. Yeah he tries to impress us by doing things physically, like strapping IMAX cameras to Spitfires, and doing The Dark Knight’s lorry flip and Inception’s rotating corridor as full-size effects. But that’s something different from showing off by doing long take action scenes. (In fact Nolan’s action often receives criticism for chopping around too much.)

    I’m a sucker for a one-take action sequence. Movie action is usually about two things: tension for seeing if/how the heroes will survive; and impressing the audience by indulgently showing off stunts, choreography, VFX (and sometimes animation). Long takes aren’t necessarily any better at the former, but they’re perfect for the latter. The one shot gunfight in Hard-Boiled always impresses me (even though when it comes to John Woo films, The Killer is a better final shootout and a better film as a whole). And the one in Tom Yum Goong/The Protector is also a triumph of co-ordination between cast and crew. I’m also willing to go along with long takes that are faked by being stitched together, like the one at the start of The Villainess.

    For examples of long takes that are effective for story purposes, I’d point to the one at the start of Serenity (2005), because as well as introducing all the characters (something that could indeed have been accomplished in multiple shots), it’s also a really efficient way of introducing the layout and scale of the ship (which would have taken much longer if if it had been split up into multiple shots). That was useful for me as I saw the film before I saw the Firefly TV series.

    I love Hitchcock’s Rope as well: yeah, it’s showing off, but I like seeing the occasional formal exercise like that. I’m less keen on Birdman. I haven’t seen 1917.

    #258845
    Pete Part Three
    Participant

    Seconded. The Prestige is my favourite of his and gets even better on repeat viewings. He hasn’t made a bad film IMHO. (And I include Following in that, which for a debut feature on a minuscule budget, is brilliant)

    #258846
    Pete Part Three
    Participant

    That was me “seconding” PerfMon and the recommendation of The Prestige obvs.

    And now I’ll recommend 1917 to Nick. I was far more conscious of the “one take” nature of Rope (and therefore the ‘hidden’ edits Hitchcock put in) than the same aspects when employed in 1917. The best compliment I can pay it was that I very quickly stopped being conscious of the apparent lack of cuts.

    #258847
    Dave
    Participant

    1917 was an amazing experience. I was prepared for the one-take thing to feel gimmicky but it didn’t feel like that at all.

    #258853
    Rodon
    Participant

    I am a fan of Nolan’s work with The Prestige being one of my all time favourite movies but I have to say…

    This doesn’t look very good…

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