Home Forums Ganymede & Titan Forum Could you heat this Gazpacho soup please…

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  • #4829
    Jo
    Participant
    #103638
    ori-STUDFARM
    Participant

    So Rimmer was right to ask for it being brought back hot!!!!!!

    He could have been an officer!

    #103656
    Blisschick
    Participant

    Traditionally it’s served cold…but to hell with tradition. Cold soup sucks.

    #103668

    Shirley hot soup sucks. Cold soup would get stuck half way up the straw.

    #103669
    Seb Patrick
    Keymaster

    Surely if it’s hot, then it’s not gazpacho? That’d be like making… spaghetti lasagne.

    Surely it’s just “tomato soup”?

    #103670
    si
    Participant

    It’s Weightwatchers. They’re not going to eat it anyway.

    #103679
    Bob Loblaw
    Participant

    No soup for you!

    #103680
    Jonathan Capps
    Keymaster

    > Surely it?s just ?tomato soup??

    Isn’t the thing that makes it gazpacho the actual ‘erbs and spices that are added to the tomato?

    #103681
    JamesTC
    Participant

    Go back to Russia!

    #103684
    Seb Patrick
    Keymaster

    >Isn?t the thing that makes it gazpacho the actual ?erbs and spices that are added to the tomato?

    Only in so much as they’re a part of the recipe. As is chilling it, as opposed to heating it.

    If I make batter, but I cook it in a flat pan rather than a roasting dish, then I’m not making Yorkshire pudding, I’m making pancakes. Same dealio.

    #103695
    Blisschick
    Participant

    I had to look up Yorkshire pudding. It’s one of those things I’ve heard about, but never eaten. Now I’m positively hungry. :(

    #103698
    si
    Participant

    YOU’VE NEVER HAD YORKSHIRE PUDDING?!!

    #103700
    JamesTC
    Participant

    I was once out of bread so I made cheese on yorkshire pudding, it was quite nice.

    #103713
    Tanya Jones
    Participant

    >YOU?VE NEVER HAD YORKSHIRE PUDDING?!!

    Blisschick is one of our American cousins, Si. It’s a normal state of affairs over there.

    #103717
    si
    Participant

    I don’t care. It’s still inconceivable.

    #103720
    Tarka Dal
    Participant

    YOU?VE NEVER HAD YORKSHIRE, PUDDING?

    #103722
    hummingbird
    Participant
    #103723
    Blisschick
    Participant

    I swear, after reading about it, I WILL try it. I obviously cannot be a card carrying bread junkie without having tried it at least once. Sadly, I have no roast in the freezer at the moment. Will a pound of bacon do?

    #103724
    ChrisM
    Participant

    That might work.

    Traditionally I associate them with roast beef, although they’ll go with pretty much any roast I reckon. Mind you, I could see them working with gammon…

    I made some roast potatoes today. Not a big deal I know, but they turned out rather well and I’m rather pleased with myself. (I’m not the chief cook in the house and roast potatoes tend to be a bit ‘meh’ for some reason. Probably as my Dad tends to roast them from raw, and I boiled them first. Makes quite a difference) They were still a bit moist inside(I like them crispy outside, dry white and fluffy inside) but they were very nice.

    EDIT- Nominated post for YAWN OF THE YEAR.

    Still roast potatoes are nice aren’t they? :)

    #103725
    hummingbird
    Participant

    > Nominated post for YAWN OF THE YEAR.

    Not at all.
    When can I come round for dinner?

    #103726
    Mr Flibble
    Participant

    I obviously cannot be a card carrying bread junkie without having tried it at least once.

    Bread? In Yorkshire Pudding? You’ll be very disappointed.

    #103727
    Blisschick
    Participant

    Well, by bread, I mean any bready type of product, pastries included. Only bread pudding should actually contain bread. I make a mean one, myself.

    #103728
    Blisschick
    Participant

    Sorry…double post

    #103729
    Tanya Jones
    Participant

    >(I?m not the chief cook in the house and roast potatoes tend to be a bit ?meh? for some reason. Probably as my Dad tends to roast them from raw, and I boiled them first. Makes quite a difference)

    Yes, parboiling is important! I make a good roast, even if I do say so myself :)

    #103732
    ori-STUDFARM
    Participant

    Sorry, but Gammon?

    It has to go with gravy! Every Yorkshire Pudding must be filled with meat and gravy. And that meat must be sheep or cow based….and maybe goat!

    Although my Mum eats cold Yorkshire Pud and strawberry Jam! Bleurch!

    #103733
    JamesTC
    Participant

    >It has to go with gravy! Every Yorkshire Pudding must be filled with meat and gravy. And that meat must be sheep or cow based?.and maybe goat!

    So you have never tried cheese on Yorkshire Pudding?!?

    #103734
    ori-STUDFARM
    Participant

    No, but I do like cheese and I am left thinking that it might be worth a go! Lets face it, cheese comes from cows, goats AND sheep…..but never pig!

    #103735
    Blisschick
    Participant

    Okay, folks, here is my very first attempt at Yorkshire Pudding:
    Photobucket

    Whaddya think?

    The travesty of this is that I have discovered that I am completely out of gravy mixes of any kind (a felony in the Southern US), and that they do not do well with grilled steak. I NEED GRAVY! I’ll never cook another pot roast again without having these. Happy now, Si?

    #103736
    Blisschick
    Participant

    I forgot to add…the very first thing my daughter says is “They need butter and syrup.” Gah.

    #103737
    JamesTC
    Participant

    They look delicious!

    #103738
    JamesTC
    Participant

    >I forgot to add?the very first thing my daughter says is ?They need butter and syrup.? Gah.

    Actually some people do eat them with stuff like that inside, some people eat them after dinner as dessert, I wouldn’t but alot do.

    #103739
    Andrew
    Participant

    I’m a frequent maker of Yorkshire puds – and I’d say that first batch have come out extremely well.

    Gravy be damned – any sauce will do. Tomato ketchup, BBQ, the mint stuff that they chuck in free with popadoms. The world is your pudding!

    #103740
    Blisschick
    Participant

    >They look delicious!
    >I?m a frequent maker of Yorkshire puds – and I?d say that first batch have come out extremely well.

    Thank you! We won’t discuss the last batch of 4 that I forgot in the oven…at least the dog will eat them, and the smoke detector didn’t go off. :-/

    >Actually some people do eat them with stuff like that inside, some people eat them after dinner as dessert, I wouldn?t but alot do.

    To me, they taste pretty neutral, so I guess if someone were inclined to eat them with sweet stuff, it would work. I’ve been craving salty stuff lately, so I’m really wanting some gravy with them. I just took a trip to the store to find they had mixes on sale. It’ll do, but I agree they need to be eaten with beef. I wonder how they’d do in venison? Deer season is coming up in a few months…
    *smacks lips hungrily*

    #103741
    ChrisM
    Participant

    >Actually some people do eat them with stuff like that inside, some people eat them after dinner as dessert, I wouldn?t but alot do.

    It’s all a mental association though really isn’t it? We see it as a savoury thing, something that is covered in gravy so the idea of adding sweet stuff to it makes us thing “Blergh!” Just bear in mind you don’t have to add the gravy with the cream and jam, like. ;)*

    As has been mentioned, they are essentially chubby pan cakes though. Except crunchy. And cooked in the oven. Ok they’re not much like pancakes… but bear with me. When I heard some people have pancakes savoury my reaction was much the same. Trying it, in a pancake restaurant in Paris…it was ok. (The fat French pancakes.) Not as good as the pudding though.

    *That reminds me. I seem to remember trying strawberry jam with turkey or chicken once as I figured cranberry sauce is more or less the same thing…except a different berry. In this case it really doesn’t go.

    #103742
    Jonathan Capps
    Keymaster

    > I?ve been craving salty stuff lately

    I hear John’s salty gravy is tops.

    Seriously, though, those Yorkshire puds look tops, and take that from a born and bred Yorkshireman. Looks like you’ve nailed the crispy edges and soft centre.

    #103743
    Blisschick
    Participant

    >Seriously, though, those Yorkshire puds look tops, and take that from a born and bred Yorkshireman. Looks like you?ve nailed the crispy edges and soft centre.

    I’m sincerely flattered. Yes, the insides were nice and squishy (but not too much), and the outsides were nice and crispy.

    #103744
    Tanya Jones
    Participant

    Great Yorkshire puds! I’ve had a pancake with chicken curry before: surprisingly good!

    #103745
    hummingbird
    Participant

    Those puds look great!
    Next you’ll have to make one big one and fill the centre with your gravy, meat, etc so that it all soaks in, and mmmmmm…….

    #103746
    ori-STUDFARM
    Participant

    Now I’m craving giant yorkshire pud filled with onion gravy and lincolnshire sausage…..who said piggy meat doesn’t go!

    #103748
    ChrisM
    Participant

    >Now I?m craving giant yorkshire pud filled with onion gravy and lincolnshire sausage?..who said piggy meat doesn?t go!

    Isn’t that basically Toad in the hole? Except cooked like that, like.

    Mmmm. Toad in the hole. It’s ages since I’ve had that.

    Quick point for non British perusers of this board: No toads are actually harmed in the preparation of this dish.

    #103752
    ori-STUDFARM
    Participant

    ^ Not if the sausages are softly stewed in the gravy and poured into the giant yorkshire pud. Toad in the Hole has sausages that are baked inside the yorkshire pudding mix and thus, quite dry.

    Fucking hell! How anal am I about yorkshire pudding! I never noticed before! And I don’t even know how to cook ’em! Aunt Bessie does all mine!

    #103753
    si
    Participant

    >Happy now, Si?

    Yes.

    #103756
    Tanya Jones
    Participant

    >Aunt Bessie does all mine!

    Blegh. I wouldn’t touch her batter if you paid me.

    #103758
    ChrisM
    Participant

    I had some British dumplings for the first time in years the other day. They were as part of a pre-made beef stew mix heated in the mircrowave and as such were a bit chewy and not exactly prime but having not had them in a while they were welcome.

    All the dumplings I’ve had in the last few years have been of the West Indian variety, recipe:

    Handful of flour wet with water,

    Roll in a ball or strips.
    Boil or fry.

    Actually they’re rather nice. Particularly mixed with a bit of ginger powder. The fried ones are particularly good just eating as a snack as is, like a doughnut.

    But, the British suet based dumplings are something special.

    #103761
    Blisschick
    Participant

    >Isn?t that basically Toad in the hole? Except cooked like that, like.

    Funny that you mention that. A friend of mine posted on FB that’s how he cooked his. I just want to know why the heck he never cooked these for me. I’m still trying to figure out if I should cut him out of my will now.

    #103762
    Dave
    Participant

    What are grits?

    #103764
    ChrisM
    Participant

    >What are grits?

    I wondered about that too. (I think saw them briefly mentioned in a Stephen King Novel.) I think they’re potato based.

    Hang on…

    I was wrong. They’re corn based.

    Looks rather like mashed potato in that picture. Mind you I have mashed potato on the brain having just, well, mashed some(or creamed it if your middle class) for some cottage pie. Baking right now. ;)

    I didn’t quite do enough actually the carrots and things are poking through.

    #103765
    redhead85
    Participant

    Oops I thought grits was another word for tater tots…

    #103768
    hummingbird
    Participant

    > But, the British suet based dumplings are something special.

    And dead easy to make. My mum’s recipe is 2 parts self-raising flour to 1 part suet (or veggie alternative), season and mix to a dough with water, then cook them in your casserole/soup/whatever.

    So, grits is corn porridge. Well I never.

    #103795
    Blisschick
    Participant

    Grits are gritty. No joke. They’re not really porridge (oatmeal, here), much thicker than that, more like mashed potatoes or like thick cream of wheat, and very starchy. Eaten for breakfast, they taste really good with some butter, salt and pepper. Some people will mix their eggs up in them. They’re mostly a Southern thing…most Northerners here haven’t heard of them, either.

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